Finally star, Brandi Carlile considers loyalty, religious hypocrisy on the new album

POP ROCK

Brandi Carlile, “In those silent days” (Elektra)

In 2019, Carlile brought her song “The Joke” to the Grammys for a stunning performance that seemed to finally turn her into a star. Soon she reunited with Elton John and Joni Mitchell and wrote a successful memoir, “Broken Horses,” retracing her sometimes painful journey as a practicing gay child in rural Washington state.

Her new – and seventh – album opens with another wonder: a piano ballad titled “Right on Time”, in which she hits a high note, then climbs a few more steps just to make sure she tingles. the backbone of every listener. Other cups reflect on marriage, loyalty and religious hypocrisy, and offer hard-earned parenting advice to her children, as in “Stay Gentle” imbued with harmony.

Sincere and intimate even when Carlile directs her songs towards the rafters, “In These Silent Days” is sure to appeal to longtime fans who have followed the singer since she began working on the Seattle club scene in the early years. 2000s.

MIKAEL WOOD, Los Angeles Times

Tirzah, “Color” (Domino)

Some pop artists amplify familiar and universal feelings: the sweet moments in love, the twisting pain of grief. But others require that we listen with different ears. They ask us to resist the desire to fully understand music. This is the crux of the new album by this British singer-songwriter. The 10-song collection is a fluid excursion through trip-hop, noise, R&B, and electronic music, but genre categories can’t capture its fluid depth.

Tirzah has long had a knack for meditative and asymmetrical pop. Recorded after the birth of her first child and shortly before the arrival of her second, “Colorgrade” addresses the themes of motherhood, birth, death and community. But rather than making a pink album on parenting, the album revel in mood, intimacy and texture.

ISABELIA HERRERA, New York Times

NEW VERSIONS

  • • James Blake, “Friends who break your heart”
  • • Billy Bragg, “The Million Things That Never Happened”
  • • Lala Lala, “I want the door to open”
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